loading image

Visiting Forces Agreement Cancelled


On February 11, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte announced that Manila would denounce the U.S. and Philippine Visit mission agreement (VFA), an agreement that allows the U.S. military to move to the Philippines. Duterte`s decision was taken in Washington with deep concern about the possible consequences of the Indopa-Pacific strategy, which was essentially aimed at countering China`s growing ability to impose itself. Duterte`s cabinet also appear to have serious reservations about his VFA decision. They tried to discuss their concerns with him cautiously, but they understood that they probably will not change their minds. In order to make their views more attractive, they probably tried to emphasize the importance of the VFA for maintaining assistance to U.S. special forces in the fight against terrorist operations in the southern Philippines against the jihadists. Topics: government and politics, global politics, defense, defense and national security, foreign policy, Philippines, United States, Asia, China, Indonesia, Vietnam, Malaysia, Malaysia, Brunei-darussalam In January, U.S. Senator Ronald dela Rosa , the president`s first PNP chief and widely architect of the war on drugs, lifted the visa. The U.S.-Philippine Alliance, created in 1951 by the Mutual Defense Treaty, he was no stranger to stress tests – whether it was the renegotiation of basic agreements in the 1970s or the closure of U.S.

military facilities in the early 1990s (which, as we recall, led to the 1999 VFA after the growing perception of the Philippine threat to China). From this point of view, the takeover of Duterte`s presidency has provoked the Alliance`s biggest test of resistance in decades, striving to separate Manila from Washington and maintain closer relations with China and Russia, which are in some obstacles, but which still lead to periodic crises and the slowdown in U.S.-Philippine cooperation in some areas. “The presence of the U.S. military by the VFA is essential” to deter China in the South China Sea, said Jeffrey Ordaniel, assistant professor of international security studies at Tokyo International University, who called the end of the agreement “welcome development for China.” According to the text of the diplomatic note, the six-month waiver “may be extended by the Philippines for a further six months.” At the end of this period, Manila, unless further action is taken, would return to its original plan to denounce the agreement, which was first announced on 11 February 2020. The agreement contains various procedural safeguards to protect due process rights and prohibit dual threats. [2] [VIII 2-6] The agreement also exempts Filipino personnel from visa formalities and ensures expedited entry and exit; [2] [IV] requires the United States to accept Philippine driver`s licenses; [2] [V] authorizes Philippine personnel to carry weapons to U.S. military facilities during deployment; [2] [VI] provides for exemptions and import/export duties for Filipino personnel; [2] [X, XI] requires the United States

Share it on -